In Partnership With

September 1, 1918

Aircraft Production in the United States

Some Outstanding Problems in Aeronautics

News of the Fortnight

160161

Aircraft Production in the United States

Report of the Sub-Committee to the Senate Committee on Military Affairs

170171

Some Outstanding Problems in Aeronautics

We come now to a problem of the very highest present and future importance, that of maintaining the power of the engine at high altitude. The situation as it develops in the case of an airplane mounting to higher and higher levels in the atmosphere is readily appreciated with a moment’s thought.

176177

News of the Fortnight

Officials, engineers and production men of the leading aircraft manufacturers of the country, who comprise the Manufacturers' Aircraft Association, gathered in Boston on Wednesday, Aug. 14, for three purposes: 1. To inspect the plants of the Sturtevant Aeroplane Co. at Jamaica Plain and the Burgess Co. at Marblehead.
176177

Digest of the Foreign Aeronautical Press

Flying (London), July 17, 1918 A New Fokker Biplane.—The Fokker firm have been building airplanes of the D. (pursuit) class since the inception of this type at the beginning of 1916; both biplanes and triplanes were produced, fitted with Oberursel or Mercedes engines.
174175

Desirable Aeronautical Inventions

The Inventions Committee of the British Air Ministry has issued a memorandum on desirable aeronautical inventions and improvements which should be of considerable value. Generally speaking, and as far as the period of the war is concerned, no very startling change in the present types of aircraft is expected, although improvements in parts and also in details are always possible and may produce very important results.
174175

The Air Mail Service

The Air Mail Service, which the Post Office Department inaugurated on the New York-Philadelphia-Washington route on May 15, was operated by Army aviators, detailed for this purpose by the War Department, until Aug. 12, when it was entirely taken over by the Post Office Department.
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British Airship Development

The accompanying illustration, representing a British naval airship of the N. S. (North Sea) class, furnishes conclusive evidence to the considerable progress achieved by British designers in the development of large non-rigid airships.
August 151918 September 151918