March 1, 1945

Briefing for March

Down the Years in AVIATION'S Log

AMERICA WANTS COMPETITION

45

Briefing for March

45

Down the Years in AVIATION'S Log

102103

AMERICA WANTS COMPETITION

Only American Initiative Can Preserve It in World Trade
104105
EDITORIAL

Continued Air Supremacy Needs THREE-WAY Research

IT IS EASY for us to sit in comfortable arm-chairs and speculate on the inefficiency and inaccuracy of the German V-bombs, but if we were to visit certain spots in England and Belgium we would cultivate a high respect for their effectiveness as instruments of wholesale destruction.
106107

THEY'LL PUT WINGS ON ARMIES

How a revolutionary new war arm—devised by the AAF and given highest impetus by the TCC—is set up and functions . . . and a glimpse of the great potential of "vertical envelopment."

108109

Let's KEEP USING Those Contract Schools

Besides providing a pattern for fixed base operations, nation's 64 ATS flight training schools have broad potentialities — hence they should not be allowed to lapse once they've completed their present vital war jobs.

112113

STAYING AHEAD THROUGH BASIC RESEARCH

Fundamental work by NACA on compressibility, cooling, stability, control, and other primary problems, has been a vital factor in American air supremacy, proving need for a sustained program to keep our lead.

116117
MARKETING—FINANCE

HOW TO GET YOUR SHARE Of EXPORT SALES

Here's what to do for answers to many of the problems facing every manufacturer or distributor who wants part of the vital foreign trade market.

118119
Aviation Research—Engineering—Production

DESIGN ANALYSIS OF The North American B-25 Mitchell

This distinctive gun-bristling medium bomber—first warbird to drop "eggs" on Japan—has again and again played a strikingly effective role in far-flung war performances. Here's a meaty presentation of basic B-25 makeup features and comparative details of models H and J. . . . The 11th in AVIATION'S peerless design analysis series.

142143
Aviation Research—Engineering—Production

How May We Simplify The Postwar Laboratory?

THERE IS NO SUBJECT concerning which scientific discussion is more active at the present time han the relation of research to indusry, especially the place of the laboraory under management. In Parts I and II of this series, the discussion has been concerned chiefly with the exposition of the advantages o industry of participation in scientific esearch, particularly in the aviation industry, and of the importance, national and economic, of an increase in he volume of research work of all kinds.

February1945 April1945