March 14, 1955

FORIEGN AVIATION

Canada and U.s. Weld Air Defense Team

ENGINEERING

Research Extends Propulsion Frontiers

AVIONICS

Military Avionics Seeks Jackpot Payoffs

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FORIEGN AVIATION

Canada and U.s. Weld Air Defense Team

Canada—Canadian aviation policy and practice today emphasize two large and important factors—a sureness of growth and ever-closer teamwork with the U. S. The course of Canada’s air industry, which had a significant new birth in 1951, spells cooperation with the U. S. all along the way.

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ENGINEERING

Research Extends Propulsion Frontiers

Propulsion progress is the key to further advance in aeronautical development. Without this progress, there can be no real advances in probing the unknowns of the air. No longer can a “standard” powerplant be adapted to a wide scope of services embracing a broad band of operating conditions.
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AVIONICS

Military Avionics Seeks Jackpot Payoffs

The airplane changes radically, and aerial warfare with it, but man remains the same. The task of bridging this everwidening gap between “Mach-busting” military aircraft and unchanging man is largely in the hands of the avionics industry and its engineers.

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AIR TRANSPORT

Trunks Head for New Records, Problems

The U.S. air transport industry was a healthy giant during 1954. The past year saw one segment of commercial air transportation—the 13 scheduled trunk airlines—approach $1 billion gross revenue. Backbone of the industry, the domestic trunklines, in 1954 established record highs in all but one type of traffic.

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MANUFACTURING

Equipment Faces Supersonic Barriers

Growing Air Force emphasis on the weapons system concept, coupled with the rapidly growing number of USAF aircraft capable of supersonic speed in level flight, is imposing a host of new, extremely difficult problems on aircraft equipment suppliers.

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HELICOPTERS

Military Holds Key to Copter Future

There is strong evidence of new and growing maturity in the helicopter industry. Like almost everything else involved in rotary-wing aviation in the past few years, this maturity was not a gradual thing. There was no slow dawning of a light.

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AVIONICS

Can 1947 Concepts Meet 1955 Needs?

The current Vortac snafu underscores the fact that in the present Age of Peril, when the continental U. S. could become a nuclear battleground at any moment, the line of demarcation between “tactical” military and civil aviation nav-aid systems can no longer be firmly drawn.
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FORIEGN AVIATION

British Airpower at the Turning Point?

London—At first glance, you might be tempted to sum up the last 12 months of British military aviation as “more of the same.” The skies still don’t swarm with hundreds of Britain’s latest and best. Production in many cases is still bogged down.

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MILITARY POWER

Navy Recasts Tactics Around New Planes

U. S. Navy’s investment in new airpower weapons and concepts is beginning to pay off with the most unusual and inventive aircraft design approaches developed by the military in recent years. New prototypes, ranging from lightweight attack bombers and vertical-takeoff interceptors to fast flying boats, are the Navy’s first healthy returns on its lean postwar budgets.

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MILITARY POWER

Usaf’s Next Goal Is Superior Weapons

U. S. Air Force has grown to significant strength with 121 wings equipped with modern aircraft and combat-ready in March. Now it faces grave problems in strategy, tactics, logistics, command organization and technology to maintain an effective lead over its Russian competition and to fulfill successfully its mission as a major instrument of U. S. foreign policy in deterring Soviet aggression.

March 71955 March 211955