February 6, 1956

SAFETY

Prop Reverse Circuits Were ‘off’

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

Fairchild J44 Designed to Replace Rato

Britain’s Aircraft Production

Too Little, Too Late Plagues Industry

9495
SAFETY

Prop Reverse Circuits Were ‘off’

A Boeing 377, N 74601, owned by North-west Airlines, Inc., and operated as Flight 410, went through the airport boundary fence beyond the far end of runway 31L after landing on that runway at Chicago Midway Airport, on August 5, 1955, at 1301.1 No injuries were incurred by the passengers or crew.
5253
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

Fairchild J44 Designed to Replace Rato

The Fairchild Engine Division hopes to place its small J44 turbojet engine on the market by late spring with the immediate objective of replacing Rato in civil and military transport and cargo operations. The engine, only U.S.-designed small turbojet in anything more than token production, already has completed 95% of the 150-hr. inhabited aircraft qualification run required by military specifications.

6667
Britain’s Aircraft Production

Too Little, Too Late Plagues Industry

What are the nation’s needs in aircraft? I presume we should all fully agree that they are primarily to have an adequate Air Force to defend ourselves against an aggressor and then, in the very pressing and ever-increasing air transport field, to have a sufficient range of competitive tvpes to meet our own needs, as well as to reap a reasonable share of the valuable world market for the next 10 years ahead, so as to occupy the hard core of our now important aircraft industry, which employs about 250,000 people.

3233
MANAGEMENT

Army’s Weapon Plan Indicates More Responsibility for Industry

Washington—U. S. Army’s increasing emphasis on research and development, utilizing better planning and better coordination with operational requirements, indicates a growing role for industry in providing equipment for the foot soldier.

104105
AIR TRANSPORT

Atomic Transports 15-20 Years Away

Special study panel says commercial use will depend on military development, cites high costs hazards.

7879
AVIONICS

Arinc Tests Pinpoint Major Cause of Avionic Equipment Failures

Tube failures may be slashed by as much as 80% in aircraft which have 27.5-volt d.c. power systems, if tube heaters are operated at their rated 6.3 volts instead of the widely used 6.9 volts. This conclusion is based upon two-year tests on a number of AN/ARC-27 UHF transceivers conducted by Aeronautical Radio, Inc., under Navy sponsorship.

4041
FINANCIAL

Where Money for Base Construction Will Go

Washington—Over $1.1 billion of the $2 billion public works authorization requested by Defense Department is for expansion of Air Force facilities. Of this total, $660 million is for continental projects and the remainder for overseas and classified projects.
2829
MANAGEMENT

Production Contract Is Not ‘automatic’

USAF’s Air Materiel Command has issued a new double-barrelled warning to the nation’s aircraft and component makers: • AMC does not recognize any claim to proprietary rights by industry when a weapons system or component is developed in all or part with USAF money.
2425
MANAGEMENT

Washington Roundup

Outlook now is that the House Armed Services Investigating Subcommittee’s public hearings on the earnings of aircraft firms on military contracts will open late this month. The delay in the opening has been caused by other legislative business—measures authorizing the Navy’s shipbuilding program, medical care for military personnel, the military construction programs of the three services, and limiting the authority to negotiate defense contracts.

8687
AVIONICS

New Avionic Products

Delay line, Model SIP4, lumped constant type, for pulse coding and decoding circuits, is tapped every 2 microseconds. Total delay time is 200 microseconds, with rise time of 4 μs. Attenuation reportedly is under 12 db. with an 8 μs pulse.
January 301956 February 131956