December 17, 1956

FINANCIAL

Usaf Contracts

SAFETY

Pv-1 Stalled Too Low for Recovery

PRODUCTION

Beryllium Offers High Structural Promise

6465
FINANCIAL

Usaf Contracts

Following is a list of unclassified contracts for $25,000 and over as released by Air Force Contracting Offices: ROME AIR FORCE DEPOT, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York. Eastman Kodak Co., 343 State St., Rochester 4, N. Y., film, 9%"° x 370', type 1B, class L, 500 roll; film, filters and chemicals, for serial color photo, 100 set; film, 20" x 24", type VIID, class E, 100 pkg., (RFP 30-635-56-4499Q), $58308.
116117
SAFETY

Pv-1 Stalled Too Low for Recovery

A Lockheed PV-1, N 2000C, owned and operated by the Swiflite Aircraft Corp., crashed and burned at 16331 on Jan. 26, 1956, three miles west of Smithtown, L. I., N. Y. Three pilots, the only occupants, were killed and the aircraft was destroyed by impact and ground fire.
5657
PRODUCTION

Beryllium Offers High Structural Promise

Los Angeles—Inherent lightness and strength of beryllium may permit drastic reductions in airframe weight and afford considerable improvement in aircraft performance. An extensive overall study of the characteristics of beryllium indicates that the metal offers high promise as an aircraft and missile structural material.

2627

B-58 Hustler Packs a Big Punch in a Small Frame

Convair B-58 Hustler weapons system is a little airplane designed to perform big missions. Into its minimum-sized airframe Convair designers have packed the ability to carry a wide variety of external pods crammed with offensive or defensive weapons at supersonic dash speeds over the target area.

106107
BUSINESS FLYING

Usaf's Contract Training Saves Money

Mission, Tex.—USAF’s Air Training Command is saving American taxpayers an estimated $11.5 million annually with its civilian contract concept for pilot primary training. Efficiency of the operation may further be measured by these figures: the nine schools operated by the civilian contractors require a total of only about 6,500 civilian and 300 Air Force personnel.

3839
AIR TRANSPORT

Smooth Pilot Transition to Jets Expected

Los Angeles—Transition training for jet transports will not present any more problems than transition from one piston-powered transport to another. A. M. (Tex) Johnston, Boeing Airplane Company’s chief of flight test, made this prediction before a Los Angeles symposium attended by about 200 industry engineers, pilots and administrators.

138139

Letters

I have read with a great deal of interest your series of three articles covering the procurement and use of American-built helicopters in the French Algerian area (AW Sept. 17, p. 28; Sept. 24, p. 88, Oct. 1, p. 73). Since we were following the evaluation test previously performed at Fort Rucker, and since we were vitally interested in the results, we were in a favored position to judge the accuracy of the reports.
5051
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

Boundary Layer Control Aids Helicopters

Boundary layer control can extend the high speed limits of helicopters— this has been proven by CH-1 flight tests, according to S. H. Hinton, engineer for Cessna Aircraft Co., Helicopter Division. Sucking air through slots in a modified CH-l’s rotors verified that a helicopter was able to fly at least 13% faster than its ordinary upper speed stall limit.

3233

Jet Vortices Present Light Plane Hazard

Eglin AFB, Fla.—U. S. Army and Air Force are probing the violence and duration of turbulence created by jet aircraft on takeoff in a series of experiments that may have a revolutionary effect upon air traffic controls. Under the engineering direction of the Army Aviation Board at Ft. Rucker, Ala., a QL-17 drone is being flown at 110 mph. through the wingtip vortices of an F-100 fighter and B-47 medium jet bomber to determine the duration, characteristics and intensity of the turbulence.

4041
AIR TRANSPORT

Atlantic Charter Business Booming

MID-DECEMBER1956 December 241956