In Partnership With

March 18, 1957

SAFETY

Throttle Linkage Suspected in Py Crash

MISSILE ENGINEERING

Hypersonic Glider Studied as ‘manned Missile’ Hope

AVIONICS

Funds Lag for Basic Research on Infrared

130131

SAFETY

Throttle Linkage Suspected in Py Crash

A Lockheed PV-1, N 64001, owned and operated by the Crane Company, crashed near Jeffersonville, Indiana, on May 15, 1956, about 1038.1 All eight occupants— six passengers and two pilots—were killed and the aircraft was destroyed by impact.
7273

MISSILE ENGINEERING

Hypersonic Glider Studied as ‘manned Missile’ Hope

New York—Hypersonic glider, under intensive study in the U. S., is regarded by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics as probably the most effective means of giving manned aircraft missile velocity. One of the final steps in aircraft evolution prior to the true space ship, the hypersonic glider is not only the subject of active, study by NACA, which is seeking basic answers (AW Mar. 11, p. 51), but also by Convair Division, General Dynamics Corp. and Bell Aircraft Corp. under USAF contract.

8889

AVIONICS

Funds Lag for Basic Research on Infrared

Infrared systems are threatening to outstrip the state of the art. The military must channel more funds into basic component-materials research and development, infrared experts warn. Current infrared system developments already are pinched for lack of detectors, optical materials and/or techniques suitable for use in high-speed, high-altitude aircraft and missiles.

3839

TRANSPORT

707 Flight Shows Passenger Appeal

Baltimore—Any present day airliner is going to have tough competition for passenger appeal from the jet transport, the first transcontinental jet passenger flight demonstrated last week. Flying its 707 prototype from Seattle to Friendship International Airport here in 3 hr., 48 min., Boeing Airplane Co. offered evidence that the rosy promises of the jet age have a solid foundation.

114115

BUSINESS FLYING

Executive Ventura Has 300 Mph. Speed

San Antonio, Tex.—Major face-lifting of the surplus World War II Lockheed Ventura PV-1 patrol bomber into a 300 mph.-plus executive transport has been the major factor in building a fixed base operator’s annual income to an anticipated $8 million this year.
5051

TRANSPORT

Slick, in Black, Sees Brighter Future

Dallas—Last year Slick Airways produced its first profit since the merger with the Flying Tiger fell through. The cargo airline looks to 1957 as a year of expansion throughout its diverse pattern of operations. Slick earned a profit of about 50 cents a share on its 848,000 shares of common stock in 1956, an encouraging reversal from the previous year when the airline incurred a $553,357 loss.

4041

TRANSPORT

Twa Helps Organize Foreign Airlines

New York—Trans World Airlines specializes in helping foreign nations organize their air transportation. Sometimes TWA is paid a flat fee or receives a token amount of stock for this service. Payment usually is nominal; TWA’s real dividend comes in expanded influence within the country, which often awards preferred scheduling or other long range benefits.
3233

FINANCIAL

U. S. Airline Financial Picture Worries National Aviation Head

New York—Domestic airlines will face severe financial problems in the next few years, but the aircraft manufacturing industry should do well, according to a top Wall Street investment analyst. Domestic trunk airlines need a continuing strong uptrend in operating income, which has not been present lately, to maintain even a modest profit return, in the opinion of Frederick F. Robinson.

9697

EQUIPMENT

New Fire Detection Bans False Alarms

New York—New type of continuous fire and overheat detection system for aircraft, aimed at killing false fire alarms, has just emerged from the laboratories of Fenwal, Inc., after ten vears of development. Feature of the system is a heat sensing of temperatures very close to (±5F), a predetermined setting regardless of the length of detector exposed to the heat.

3031

TRANSPORT

Caa, Alpa Meet to Smooth Relations

Washington—Airline Pilots Assn, and the Civil Aeronautics Administration will meet here tomorrow in an unprecedented joint committee session in an effort to ease strained relations between the two groups. Wide-spread differences between the Air Line Pilots Assn, and the CAA began approximately eight months ago and stem from ALPA’s growing resentment over the lifting of pilots’ certificates by the CAA in enforcement cases prior to the CAB hearings.
March 111957 March 251957