May 2, 1960

AIRLINE FACTS AND FIGURES ISSUE

Air Transportation

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

Faa, Nasa Study Supersonic Transport

EQUIPMENT

Douglas Plans Automated Cargo System

8485
AIRLINE FACTS AND FIGURES ISSUE

Air Transportation

Through the medium of words, statistics, and illustrations, this report records the first full year of the jet age—1959. It cites in detail the accomplishments of the United States’ certificated scheduled airlines and the amazing response of the public to their efforts.
6061
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

Faa, Nasa Study Supersonic Transport

Washington—Three problems of critical importance have emerged from a coordinated Federal Aviation AgencyNational Aeronautics and Space Administration program to identify and solve the basic problems of developing and operating a money-making supersonic commercial transport.

148149
EQUIPMENT

Douglas Plans Automated Cargo System

Santa Monica, Calif.—Douglas Aircraft Co. plans to offer an entirely automated and mechanized portal-to-portal air cargo system to military and civil air cargo carriers, rather than just a jet all-cargo airplane. Douglas calls the civilian version the Total Air Cargo System but will sell its elements separately, if necessary.

118119
SPECIAL TRANSPORT REPORTS

Caravelle Shows Service Dependability

Paris—Low engine-failure rate coupled with relatively high daily utilization and minimum technical delays have characterized the initial period of Sud Caravelle twin-jet scheduled service with Air France and Scandinavian Airlines System.

7475
SPECIAL TRANSPORT REPORTS

Delta 880 Training Paves Way for May 15 Service

Atlanta—Delta Air Lines, scheduled to begin Convair 880 jet transport service on May 15, anticipates a relatively trouble-free transition to the new aircraft in scheduled operations. The expectation is based largely upon experience gained thus far with the one 880 which Delta has had since Feb. 12 for crew training work.

138139
SPECIAL TRANSPORT REPORTS

Design Details of Rolls-royce Conway

Montreal—Bypass configuration of the Rolls-Royce Conway turbojet was designed to produce a low specific fuel consumption, a high power-to-weight ratio, and a minimum jet-noise level. Intended for use in long-range transports, the civil Conway—the RCo. 12 —is now in service with Boeing 707-420s and Douglas DC-8s.

3839
AIR TRANSPORT

Policy Shifts Expected From New Cab

Board members support Commerce study, suggest an overhaul of their regulatory approach.

176177
FINANCIAL

Rising Costs Delay Jet Transport Profits

Manufacturers of U.S. turbine transports are hoping 1960 will finally see these airplanes begin to make some return on investment, but factors of higher than projected costs and competitive pressures still make the process a long and uncertain one.

4243
SPECIAL TRANSPORT REPORTS

Airlines Streamline Turbojet Maintenance

New York—Major U. S. carriers, with up to 20 months of turbojet operating experience now behind them, are gearing overhaul and maintenance procedures to match the speed and efficiency of their jet transport fleets. The impact of the jets is quickening the pace of maintenance at all levels and is best reflected bv the International Business Machines Co. parts control systems, X-ray inspection equipment and private line telephone nets being installed in the larger airlines’ hangars.

184185
FINANCIAL

Airlines Report Officers’ Compensation

Washington—Following is a list of airline officers’ salaries, bonuses and indirect compensations, expenses and stock holding for the year ending Dec. 31, 1959, as reported to the Civil Aeronautics Board. Continental Air Lines, Inc.—R. F. Six, president and director, $61,667 salary, $27,590 expenses and 5,250 shares of common stock; H. L. Lawrence, vice president and director, $28,613 salary, $2,309 expenses and 210 shares of common stock; A. Damm, vice president-finance, $18,477 salary, $1,290 expenses and no stock; H. W. Bell, Jr., vice president-personnel, $14,280 salary, $3,495 expenses and 161 shares of common stock; C. II. Calhoun, vice president-engineering and maintenance, $19,647 salary, $1,977 expenses and 210 shares of common stock; M. L. Davis, vice president-sales, $17,833 salary, $2,042 expenses and no stock; L. H. Dennis, vice presidentpassenger service, $19,647 salary, $2,476 expenses and 945 shares of common stock; S. O. Halberg, vice president-public relations and advertising (left company May 15, 1959), $5,438 salary, $230 expenses and 1,155 shares of common stock.
April 251960 May 91960