August 1, 1960

SAFETY

Pilots Misread Altimeters in Boac Crash

SPACE TECHNOLOGY

Space Stations Require Radical Design, Structures

AIR TRANSPORT

Non-union Pilot Seniority Issue Sparks Alpa-southern Dispute

9293
SAFETY

Pilots Misread Altimeters in Boac Crash

(Following is a report to Minister of Aviation Duncan Sandys from P. G. Tweedie, chief inspector of accidents, into circumstances involving the crash of a Bristol Britannia 312 turboprop transport, owned by British Overseas Airways Corp., on a test flight near Sopley Park, Christchurch, Dec. 24, 1958.
5455
SPACE TECHNOLOGY

Space Stations Require Radical Design, Structures

Washington—Third generation manned space vehicles are scheduled to be relatively spacious and to operate for years without major repair. This means they will require design concepts and construction materials radically different from those used in the cramped, short-lived Mercury vehicle and the second generation multiman capsule.

3839
AIR TRANSPORT

Non-union Pilot Seniority Issue Sparks Alpa-southern Dispute

Atlanta—Prospects for immediate settlement of the seven-week-old Southern Airways pilots’ strike appeared dim last week as management and labor refused to give ground over issues which evolved into a dispute between the Air Line Pilots Assn. and all major carriers serving the southeast.

4647
AIR TRANSPORT

Disputes Rise Over New Capacity Policy

2829
MANAGEMENT

Republicans Pledge New Defense Efforts

7879
MANAGEMENT

Marquardt Plans to Diversify to Survive

Columbus, Ohio—Faced with the approaching completion of the Bomarc engine program, Marquardt Corp. is fighting for corporate survival by aggressive moves into the electronics and space fields to tide over the critical years. This is the view of Roy E. Marquardt, corporation president, who told AVIATION WEEK his company has a number of promising projects under study but added “the big question is whether there will be time to bring them to fruition.” The alternative, which Marquardt apparently is attempting to avoid as long as possible, is selling the company to one of the airframe or engine firms that have been knocking on its corporate door.

8283
BUSINESS FLYING

Time-lease Firms Spur Business Travel

Nationwide utilization of twin-engine business aircraft leased to corporations on a guaranteed-use time basis is being spurred by two new companies which will supply aircraft, pilots and services. The firms are Air Time Leasing Division of Aero-Industries, Inc., of Miami, Fla., and Private Air Travel, Inc., of Erie, Pa.

7273
AVIONICS

Wadd Avionics Division Aims at Space

Dayton, Ohio—Newly formed Avionics Division of the Wright Air Development Division hopes to obtain nearly $50 million in Fiscal 1961 funds for applied research programs, the bulk of it for projects which are oriented toward space. The Avionics Division, headed by Col. R. D. Keator, one of four divisions in the Directorate of Advanced Technology, is responsible for applied research as distinguished from hardware development for specific weapon systems.

2627
MISSILE ENGINEERING

AMC Plans Icbm Site Activation Force

Twelve regional commanders will be assigned to speed Atlas, Titan bases toward operational status.
3031
MANAGEMENT

Soviet Veto Stops RB-47 Investigation

New York—A Soviet veto in the U. N. Security Council last week scuttled a U. S. resolution urging an impartial investigation of whether the USAF RB-47 shot down by the Russians on July 1 had actually penetrated Soviet airspace. The Russian rejection of the proposal followed U. S. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge’s revelation that Soviet Air 'Force Tu-16 bombers regularly were flying electronic reconnaissance missions along Alaska’s western perimeter and had been “for years.” One such flight, Lodge said, penetrated U. S. airspace 5 naut. mi. off St. Matthew Island in the Bering Sea.

July 251960 August 81960