August 22, 1960

SAFETY

Dynamite Caused National Dc-6b Crash

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

Mach 4 Plane Could Be Built with Current Technology

AVIONICS

Megawatt Power Levels Sought for Space

8687
SAFETY

Dynamite Caused National Dc-6b Crash

At approximately 0238 EST Jan. 6, 1960, a National Airlines DC-6B crashed in a field approximately 1½ mi. northwest of Bolivia, N. C. All 29 passengers and the crew of five were killed (AW Jan. 11, p. 34). Flight 2511 of Jan. 5, 1960, departed New York International (Idlewild) Airport at 2334 on an IFR clearance scheduled as a nonstop flight to Miami, Fla.
5455
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

Mach 4 Plane Could Be Built with Current Technology

Washington—Aeronautical research has brought the state of the art in major design areas to a point somewhere between the skills needed for the North American B-70 Mach 3 cruise bomber and the sophistication required for the Boeing Dyna-Soar Mach 18 hypersonic research vehicle.

6869
AVIONICS

Megawatt Power Levels Sought for Space

Washington—Air Force applied research program in space vehicle power technology is placing primary emphasis on dynamic type systems for the upper end of the power spectrum. These higher-level electric power systems, using rotating electrical generators driven by turbine or reciprocating heat engines powered by solar, nuclear or chemical energy, are intended to meet needs of space vehicles employing electric propulsion and for reconnaissance, early warning and communication satellites.

3233
SPACE TECHNOLOGY

First Capsule Recovered From Satellite

2829
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

Soviets Begin U-2 Pilot Espionage Trial

106107
BUSINESS FLYING

Super-v Has Good Engine-out Stability

Oakland, Calif.—Twin-engine conversion of the Beech Bonanza called the Super-V is designed as a relatively lowcost way for business fiyers to become multi-engine operators. Bay Aviation Services, formerly Oakland Airmotive, manufacturer of the conversion kit, foresees a market for as many as 1,000 sales.

3031
SPACE TECHNOLOGY

Echol I Satellite Meets Coast-to-coast Communications Goals

Washington—National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Echo I passive communications satellite flying in a 1,000 mi., near circular orbit, was providing coast-to-coast communications last week with signal strength within 1-2 decibels of predicted performance.
3839
AIR TRANSPORT

Coach Gains Hold Down Revenue Growth

First class traffic surpassed for the first time; trend may produce adjustments in fare structure.

104105
SPACE TECHNOLOGY

Cloud of Needles Studied for Global Relay

Washington—Cloud of tiny needles in orbit at an altitude of 3,000 mi. which would function as a huge reflectting umbrella for radio signals, is under consideration for use in the Air Force’s new AirCom (480-L) global communications network.
2627
SPACE TECHNOLOGY

Russia, U. S. Spar Over Space Cooperation

USSR seeks veto for it and U. S. in International Astronautical Federation, plus assured officersliips.

August 151960 August 291960