September 11, 1961

SPACE TECHNOLOGY

Soviet Research and Science Reorganized

SAFETY

Deicer Failure Blamed for Learstar Crash

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

British Aviation Nears Crucial Decision

5051
SPACE TECHNOLOGY

Soviet Research and Science Reorganized

104105
SAFETY

Deicer Failure Blamed for Learstar Crash

At approximately 0930 Dec. 15, 1958, a Learstar aircraft, N 37500, owned by Johnson and Johnson, Inc., crashed in a wooded area during a snowstorm approximately 5 mi. southwest of Woonsocket, R. I. The five passengers and the two crew members all received fatal injuries.
2223
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

British Aviation Nears Crucial Decision

Industry must soon decide whether or not to join with Europeans in aircraft and engine development.

3435
AIR TRANSPORT

Shift of Government Role in Aviation Seen

Project Horizon report predicts stronger U. S. hand in international affairs but less influence at home.

2627

Nato V/stol Proposals Take Shape

Farnborough—At least six design proposals will be entered in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization competition for a lightweight V/STOL closesupport fighter, all of them built around British engines. The competition, whose winners will share possibly the biggest plum for European industry over the next several years, is being waged overtly and covertly on political and technical levels with a scries of agreements and counter agreements in both areas extending from Britain to the U. S. and onto the European continent.

3839
AIR TRANSPORT

Atlantic Situation Forcing Policy Decisions

Washington—Rapid expansion of seat capacity on North Atlantic routes and a consequent decline in load factors is forcing the U. S. to make certain moves that indicate the direction it may take in establishing an international civil aviation policy.

126127

Letters

A recent issue of AVIATION WEEK stated that the big decision regarding supersonic transport has been reached—the U. S. will go for Mach 3 (AW Aug. 7, p. 38). In view of the importance of a decision such as this, as it relates to use of government funds (the taxpayer’s money), and the impact that an incorrect decision will have on the American aircraft industry, I wonder whether the subject might not be reopened?
8889
AVIONICS

20-year-life Comsat Concept Proposed

Los Angeles—Concept of a 24-hr. passive communications satellite system using high-gain reflectors and capable of relaying up to 20 television channels between New England and Europe was outlined recently before the Sixth Symposium on Ballistic Missile and Aerospace Technology, a meeting jointly sponsored by the Air Force and Aerospace Corp.

3637
AIR TRANSPORT

Airlines Block Adoption of Radio Treaty

1617
EDITORIAL

The Military Space Role—i

There has been growing concern lately over the role assigned to the military in the U. S. national space program. Such widely diverse spokesmen as Sen. John Stennis (D.-Miss.), Dr. Walter Dornberger, former commander of the German Peenemunde development center and now vice president of Bell Aerosystems Co., and Robert Seamans, associate administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, have voiced public concern over the current neglect of military aspects of the U.S. space program.

September 41961 September 181961