October 22, 1973

International Air Transport: Automating the Airline System

Computer Filling Crucial Passenger Role for Airlines

International Air Transport: Automating the Airline System

Technology Seeks Faster Terminal Flow

International Air Transport: Automating the Airline System

New Maintenance Systems Aid Efficiency

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International Air Transport: Automating the Airline System

Computer Filling Crucial Passenger Role for Airlines

Washington—Automation has revolutionized airline passenger handling procedures over the past decade. Its role is considered so overwhelming by many U. S. carriers that they cannot visualize the industry operating in its present form without the computer’s assistance.

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International Air Transport: Automating the Airline System

Technology Seeks Faster Terminal Flow

New York—Steps toward automation of airline passenger processing—signaled by increasing numbers of hardware elements making their appearance at airline counters— throw into sharp relief divergencies in approach to the problem. Several airlines, including Allegheny, American, Continental, Eastern, North Central, Trans World and United, have ordered or begun operating new automatic ticket printing equipment based on the so-called transitional automated airline ticket.

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International Air Transport: Automating the Airline System

New Maintenance Systems Aid Efficiency

New York—Maintenance is one area where airlines can use automation to offset the steady rise in material and labor costs and the Federal Aviation Administration is allowing the carriers more freedom than ever to take advantage of these opportunities.

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International Air Transport: Automating the Airline System

Europe Modernizes, Computerizes to Meet ATC Challenge

London—Computerized and automated air traffic control system for Central Europe, based largely on a U. S. supplied International Business Machines 9020D computer, is taking shape to meet target dates starting in 1975 in England. British air traffic control is already interfaced with Eurocontrol and its main centers at Maastricht, Holland, and Karlsruhe, Germany, in control of middle air space, leaving upper air space control to an integrated military-civil command.

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International Air Transport: Automating the Airline System

Cockpit Systems Easing Crew Workloads; R-Nav, Data Link Studied

Paris—European airlines are reaching a plateau in automating flight operations and many carriers and manufacturers are looking to the U. S. for what will come next. At the same time, a new generation of European transports—including the Anglo-French Concorde, the multinational Airbus Industrie A-300B, and the French-built Mercure—will incorporate the latest concepts in workload-reducing systems and cockpit arrangements without actually stepping into any new or uncharted areas.

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International Air Transport: Automating the Airline System

Scorecard Shows Big Gains Some Losses

Washington—Automation is now accepted by airlines as a promising scientific means of controlling all aspects of air transport business, but manyof its applications are still experimental and its expansion will continue to be incremental during the foreseeable future.

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International Air Transport: Automating the Airline System

Layout Dictated Texas Airport Systems

Dallas—Concept of individual decentralized terminals to smooth the passenger/airplane interface and provide for expansion of facilities into the 21st century imposed a requirement for automated systems early in the design of the new Dallas/Ft. Worth Airport.

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Mideast War

Israeli Aircraft, Arab SAMs in Key Battle

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International Air Transport: Automating the Airline System

Automated Link for Traffic Control Center Emerges After Long Development Effort

Washington—Automation of the Federal Aviation Administration’s 20 en-route traffic control centers in the continental U. S. has just started to come on-line, but it could be several years before there is a significant beneficial effect from the $600-million investment.

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International Air Transport: Automating the Airline System

East Europe Echoes Soviet ATC Drive

Soviet Union and the East European countries are striving to update and modernize their air traffic control systems, relying heavily on an infusion of avionics technology from the west, principally the United States. The Russians and their satellite countries are hastening to take advantage of western know-how in automated air traffic control equipment and procedures as one immediate consequence of an effort to relax East-West relations.

October 151973 October 291973