December 22, 1986

SAFETY

Ntsb Evaluates Selection of Runway in Delta Accident

TECHNICAL SURVEY: FACTORY OF THE FUTURE

Airframe Makers Expect Computer Techniques to Cut Overhead Costs

TECHNICAL SURVEY: FACTORY OF THE FUTURE

Management By Computer Promises Unprecedented Productivity Gains

7273
SAFETY

Ntsb Evaluates Selection of Runway in Delta Accident

Runway Selection—The tower supervisor is primarily responsible for selecting the active runway and, according to Paragraph 3-60 of the Controllers Handbook, the controller will use “the runway most nearly aligned with the wind.” During the 20 min. before the accident, the winds were about 10 kt. or barply exceeding that value.
5657
TECHNICAL SURVEY: FACTORY OF THE FUTURE

Airframe Makers Expect Computer Techniques to Cut Overhead Costs

Los Angeles—Growth in overhead costs to nearly 10 times production costs has given airframe manufacturers powerful leverage to improve efficiency. Decreasing cost of computer power is clearing the way for worthwhile solutions to previously intractable overhead problems.

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TECHNICAL SURVEY: FACTORY OF THE FUTURE

Management By Computer Promises Unprecedented Productivity Gains

Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio—Management by computer has replaced automated production machinery as the strategy that promises future factory planners the largest gain in aerospace manufacturing productivity. Computers excel in handling management functions such as storing and retrieving information, scheduling machine use, incorporating design changes and monitoring product quality.

6263
TECHNICAL SURVEY: FACTORY OF THE FUTURE

Sustained Production Rates Hasten Automation in Europe

Paris—Europe is increasing the use of computer-controlled manufacturing techniques and robotics for its aerospace production in a steady, but paced effort. The sustained production rates for programs such as the Airbus A300/A310/A320 and Panavia Tornado are allowing the major airframe manufacturers and their suppliers to invest more heavily in advanced manufacturing systems.

1819
AROUND THE WORLD FLIGHT

Voyager Crew Faces Turbulence, Fatigue on World Flight Attempt

Mojave, Calif.—The Voyager long-distance aircraft was making steady progress toward Africa on its nonstop, unrefueled around-the-world flight attempt late last week. But the crew’s endurance and the negative effects of turbulent weather and possible headwinds over Africa on the aircraft’s range are two major obstacles to completion of the flight.

6061
TECHNICAL SURVEY: FACTORY OF THE FUTURE

Production of Complex Avionics Forces Increased Computer Use

Washington—The production of increasingly complex avionics components is forcing greater use of computer-controlled manufacturing to meet the need for higher productivity rates and improved quality control. Computer integrated manufacturing is a process that incorporates computer aided design, manufacturing and engineering.

3233
AIR TRANSPORT

Airline Mergers Will Intensify Competition for Aircraft Orders

2829
Management

Third Fleet Increases North Pacific Operations to Counter Soviet Activity

Washington—Carrier task forces and surface battle groups from the U. S. Navy’s Third Fleet are increasing their operational deployments to the northern Pacific in response to growing Soviet air and naval activity near Alaska and the Aleutian Islands.

7071
TECHNICAL SURVEY: FACTORY OF THE FUTURE

Automated Pratt Facility Achieves 50% Capacity

Columbus, Ga.—Pratt & Whitney’s $200-million automated engine blade and disk manufacturing facility, which opened here in 1984, has reached about 50% of capacity and is expected to achieve full production output by the end of 1987. The plant produces compressor blades and rotor disks for Pratt & Whitney JT9D, PW2037 and PW4000 commercial engines and F100, F404 and TF30 military engines.

2223
Space Technology

Defense Decision to Use Space Station Will Delay International Negotiations

December 151986 January 51987