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December 14, 1987

Editorial

Beating Swords into Swords?

Who's Where

Industry _Observer

Industry _Observer

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Editorial

Beating Swords into Swords?

New York Last week’s U. S./Soviet summit meeting, which quickly settled into the “Ron and Mikhail Show,” was a heady affair and generated an air of euphoria that still obscures the full significance of the historic agreements it produced to eliminate intermediate nuclear forces and proceed with relatively unfettered negotiations to cut strategic missile inventories in half.

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Who's Where

Edward Randolph Jayne, 2nd, named vice president-strategic program development, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co., St. Louis. Jerry R. Junkins, president of Texas Instruments, Inc., will assume the additional title of chairman on the retirement of chairman Mark Shepherd, Jr., effective Apr. 21, 1988.
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Industry _Observer

Industry _Observer

Japan’s Air Self-Defense Force is installing hardware for its modernized Base Air Defense Ground Environment (BADGE) system, featuring improved search and target acquisition/tracking capability, simultaneous processing of targets and information on status of combat-ready interceptors, weather and other tactical elements.
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Market Focus

The INF treaty kept aerospace issues from keeping pace with the market’s broad advance. Amidst an uncertain outlook for defense spending, Martin Marietta received wide support from Wall Street analysts, based on its robust space programs and recent contract awards.
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Washington _Roundup

Washington _Roundup

Space Summit U. S./Soviet cooperation toward the NASA Mission-to-Earth goal is expected as a result of the Reagan-Gorbachev summit meeting. A communique being prepared by negotiators late last week was to endorse space cooperation on long-term environmental and climatic issues, key Mission-to-Earth elements.

1819

REAGAN/GORBACHEV SUMMIT

Soviets Retreat on START/SDI Link, Reveal New Arms Surveillance Capacity

Immediate and long-term implications of the historic summit between U. S. President Ronald Reagan and Soviet General Secretary Mikhail S. Gorbachev were assessed by an AVIATION WEEK & SPACE TECHNOLOGY editorial team headed by Paul Mann, senior White House and congressional editor, and including Michael Mecham, congressional editor; Bruce Smith, Los Angeles bureau chief; John Morrocco, military editor, and Keith Mordoff, Bonn bureau chief. Their reports follow.
1819

REAGAN/GORBACHEV SUMMIT

INF Treaty Likely to Intensify Race In Exotic Conventional Weapons

Washington—Defense analysts believe the intermediate nuclear forces (INF) treaty signed here at last week’s U. S.-Soviet summit heralds a shift from nuclear weapons to advanced conventional systems that will intensify the East/West arms race in exotic technologies.
2021

REAGAN/GORBACHEV SUMMIT

INF Treaty Specifies Methods Of Destruction for Banned Missiles

Washington—The Soviet Union and United States can explode, crush or cut up their shortand medium-range ballistic missiles to comply with the INF treaty, which calls for the elimination of those missile arsenals. These are the principal destructive methods specified in the INF protocol signed by President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev last week that specifies the destruction regime.
2021

REAGAN/GORBACHEV SUMMIT

Memorandum Details Methods Of Verifying Treaty Compliance

Washington—A memorandum to the intermediate nuclear forces treaty signed by President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev last week identifies military and contractor facilities in the continental U. S. that will be subject to short-notice, intrusive inspections by Soviet officials.
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REAGAN/GORBACHEV SUMMIT

Dutch to Maintain F-16, P-3 Nuclear Missions

Bonn—The Netherlands will maintain nuclear weapon missions with its force of F16 fighter-bombers and P-3 antisubmarine aircraft in support of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization now that the intermediate-range nuclear forces agreement has been signed.
December 71987 December 211987