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January 23, 1989

HEADLINE NEWS

Pentagon Purchases Soviet Hardware on Open Market for Operational Testing

HEADLINE NEWS

Landsat/spot Merger Talks Spark Debate on Commercial Space Venture

HEADLINE NEWS

Start of Tomahawk Flights Renews Controversy in Maine

2425

HEADLINE NEWS

Pentagon Purchases Soviet Hardware on Open Market for Operational Testing

WASHINGTON The Defense Dept. has begun purchasing Soviet-designed MiG aircraft, air defense radars and other hardware on the open market for use in testing U. S. military equipment. The purchases are part of a Capability Improvement Program advocated by John E. Krings, director of the Pentagon’s Operational Test and Evaluation (OT&E) office.

2021

HEADLINE NEWS

Landsat/spot Merger Talks Spark Debate on Commercial Space Venture

WASHINGTON U. S./French talks on the possible merger of the Landsat and Spot Earth satellite systems have sparked sharp controversy in the U. S. government and commercial space sector. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has been reprimanded by the State Dept. for failing to inform State, the White House and other key agencies that it has been holding talks with France.

2829

HEADLINE NEWS

Start of Tomahawk Flights Renews Controversy in Maine

BOSTON A U. S. Navy Tomahawk cruise missile flew over a new low-level instrument route in Maine earlier this month, marking the first use of a military training corridor that is the subject of controversy. Opposition to the new route surfaced early last year when Stephen Bean, a bush pilot and owner of a flying service in Rangeley, told Maine’s congressional delegation that the Navy had approached the Federal Aviation Administration for permission to fly cruise missiles over Maine.

2021

HEADLINE NEWS

Air Force Cannot Meet 1989 Launch Schedule

CAPE CANAVERAL The Air Force cannot launch the 25 space payloads scheduled this year because of hardware problems, manpower shortages, environmental requirements and scheduling conflicts. If 70% of the planned missions get off the ground “we’ll have earned our pay very well,” Col. Lawrence L. Gooch, commander of the Eastern Space and Missile Center, said.

2223

HEADLINE NEWS

Scientists Call for Policy on Space Nuclear Reactors

SAN FRANCISCO The Bush Administration will be asked to make an early decision on U. S. policy toward space nuclear reactors—an issue that was given new impetus by the disclosure of Soviet orbital reactor testing and charges they adversely affected U. S. and Japanese satellites.

2829

HEADLINE NEWS

Raf, German Air Force Jets Collide Over Germany

3031

HEADLINE NEWS

British-french Bid to Buy Gec Fails After AT&T Refuses to Join

3031

HEADLINE NEWS

Dassault-breguet’s 1988 Aircraft Orders Valued at $2.6 Billion

2223

HEADLINE NEWS

Nasa Plans Shuttle Launch for Feb. 23 Despite Delay in Move to Assembly Building

3435

BOOST SURVEILLANCE TRACKING SYSTEM

U. S. Developing Survivable Warning/antimissile Satellites

WASHINGTON The Defense Dept. plans to order an $8-billion sensor satellite system in 1990 to improve ballistic missile attack warning and to trigger antimissile weapons. Called the Boost Surveillance Tracking System (BSTS), the dual-role satellites will replace the current Defense Satellite Program (DSP) missile early warning system and will cue weapons in a strategic defense system.

January 161989 January 301989