November 9, 1925

AIRPORTS AND AIRWAYS

Greater Kansas City

United States Air Forces

The Organization of the French Air Services

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AIRPORTS AND AIRWAYS

Greater Kansas City

Public interest has never been greater than it is here at present. The prospect of the Fokker factory locating here, the passing through of the Ford Reliability Tour, the coming aviation demonstration at Fairfax Field, Nov. 11, have all helped to stimulate an interest that dwarfs anything seen yet, The local boys are all hopped up over the advent of the air mail, The National Air Transport, which Paul Henderson is papa of.

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United States Air Forces

U. S. ARMY AIR SERVICE Fort Leavenworth Students View Aerial Demonstration The annual demonstration flight left Kelly Field, Texas, September 29th for Fort Leaven worth, led by Major Carlyle H. Wash and Captain A. B. McDaniel. This flight, which has become an annual affair, is for the purpose of demonstrating to the students of the Command and General Staff courses at Fort Leaven worth some of the technical possibilities of an Air Service and an Air Force.
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The Organization of the French Air Services

Technical Development and Procurement for Army and Navy Administered by Separate Department.
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Captain Carolin on Bombing

Replies to Criticism of 80% Hits—Explains Bombing Theory
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New Airmail Flood Lights

20,000 Candle Power Incandescent Lamp Gives 500 Million Candle Power Flood Illumination
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The Mercury Jr.

An All-Purpose Plane Incorporating Many of the Features of the Successful Mercury Sr. Mail Plane
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Frontier Facts in Air Transportation

Results of World Investigation Reveal Tremendous Future

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Publisher’s News Letter

In referring to the annual election of the N.A.A., it was suggested that probably neither General Patrick’s nor General Mitchell’s ideas would receive much support from the new officials whose training was so predominatingly naval. The following letter from Godfrey L. Cabot, President of the N.A.A. puts the association in a new light in its efforts to make “America first in the air.”
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Editorial

The Loss of the Navy’s Seaplanes

THE WIPING out of a squadron and a half of our most modern naval three purpose type seaplanes is a disaster of such magnitude that it should be most carefully investigated and the causes ascertained. The Navy has suffered from a series of disasters that arouse sympathy, but as the accident which took place at Baltimore will probably be used as an argument to show the frailty and unreliability of aircraft, the matter cannot be passed over in silence even though it may seem somewhat like hitting a man when he is down.
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Editorial

An Air Force—a Political Issue

ONLY those who take a narrow view of the aviation controversy fail to see behind the discussion the possibilities of a political issue. That the country has lost confidence in the present organization and management of our military and naval establishments is evident from the editorials in newspapers, the applause at moving picture houses when pictures of air champions are shown, and lastly from the “Man in the Street.”
November 21925 November 161925