In Partnership With

September 1, 1932

THE UNITED STAT ES OF AMERICA (PART THREE)

The Equipment of Air Forces

THE PAN AMERICAN SYSTEM

International Transport

How Much Is Lightness Worth?

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THE UNITED STAT ES OF AMERICA (PART THREE)

The Equipment of Air Forces

A ERIAL bombardment in the United States started late and started slowly, but it has come fast in the home stretch. We were three' years behind the other countries in giving the subject any attention at all. We were more than three years behind them in focussing our attention upon the importance of high performance in bombingplanes.

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THE PAN AMERICAN SYSTEM

International Transport

AIRLINE operating practices, both on the ground and in the air, are conditioned directly by the physical nature of the surface over which the route lies, the climatical characteristics, the political nature and distribution of the points of call, and the conditions under which the employees have to function.
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How Much Is Lightness Worth?

Engineers and operators would like to know

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THE FOURTH ARTICLE OF A SERIES ON MAINTENANCE

Concentrating Maintenance for Efficiency

T.&W.A.’s new operating base at Kansas City

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Speed and Air Races

SOME DAY travel will be principally by air. But speed—speed with safety—is necessary. It was a realization of this fact that prompted me to offer the Thompson Trophy two years ago as the annual award in the 100-mile free-for-all, the closed course feature of the National Air Races to be staged this year at the Cleveland Airport Aug. 27 to Sept. 5.

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Advice to the Tired Business Man

SOME TIME ago I read a story about a small town minister who lived very happily in his smug but picayunish conception of God, heaven and the importance of humans until he made a visit to an observatory. Here the magnitude of the scheme of things violently obsoleted in a few hours a philosophy that had taken a lifetime to acquire.
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EDITORIALS

Mr. Glover Sounds a Keynote

ON JULY 20, the Second Assistant Postmaster General addressed the members of the Air Transport Section of the Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce. The date ought to be historic. June, in presidential election years, is conventionally the keynoting season.
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EDITORIALS

Soaring Turns a New Leaf

THE “glider movement” in America has entered a new phase. The meet held at Elmira in midJuly under the auspices of the Soaring Society of America marked the transition from an activity predominantly commercial to one predominantly sporting and scientific.
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STATISTICS OF THE MONTH

Statistics of the Month

THE total of licensed flying personnel, constant at about 30,000 during all of 1931, has decreased almost 2,000 since the beginning of this year. Licensed pilots, numbering 18,434 at the end of July, continue to increase gradually, but not nearly fast enough to counteract the rapid drop in valid student permits, which totaled only 10,406 at that date.
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FLYING EQUIPMENT

Air Cruiser for the Coast Guard

DESIGNED especially for the requirements of Coast Guard service, the General Aviation Manufacturing Corporation of Dundalk, Md., has just delivered to the United States Coast Guard the first of five flying boats. In patroling our shores, the Coast Guard aviation must be prepared to face a variety of conditions which impose requirements over and above those which must be met by commercial or the ordinary military aircraft.
August 11932 October 11932