September 17, 2001

Aero Products & Services

Boeing Patent Improves Spacecraft Attitude Control

PREMIER I PILOT REPORT

Premier I Aims for Top Spot in Small-Bizjet Arena

TERROR IN AMERICA

Terrorist Mass Murder: New ‘Weapon Of Choice’

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Aero Products & Services

Boeing Patent Improves Spacecraft Attitude Control

THOUSAND OAKS, CALIF. Boeing Satellite Systems has received a U.S. patent for a new method of positioning optical star trackers on satellites, enabling extremely precise determination of spacecraft attitude. This technology helped BSS win a major U.S. government weather-satellite contract and meet the demanding design requirements for the Spaceway broadband satellite system being built at BSS.

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PREMIER I PILOT REPORT

Premier I Aims for Top Spot in Small-Bizjet Arena

Premier I combines composite construction technologies with proven engines and advanced avionics to create a new breed of business jet

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TERROR IN AMERICA

Terrorist Mass Murder: New ‘Weapon Of Choice’

Grotesque transformation of airliners into weapons of mass destruction stirs profound reassessment of U.S. strategy and national security

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NBAA 2001

Fractional Ownership Programs Finding New Software Essential

NEW YORK Fractional aircraft ownership providers are relying on increasingly complex software programs to orchestrate their growing operational requirements as jet fleets continue to expand and the job of pampering owners becomes more competitive.

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TERROR IN AMERICA

Europeans Fear Major Setbacks In All Air-Related Sectors

PARIS European airlines are shuddering from the seismic aftershocks of the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington. Beyond disrupted operations, stranded passengers and major losses in revenues, an anxious public—coupled with a bleak economic forecast—could further erode European carriers’ fragile financial status and precipitate a downturn for the European airline industry.

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TERROR IN AMERICA

Terrorists May Have Planned Double Hits in Washington

WASHINGTON A gruesome synchronicity played out on Sept. 11 as teams of hijackers used four U.S. passenger aircraft as fuel-laden missiles to destroy the World Trade Center buildings and portions of the Pentagon here. Two Boeing 767s slammed into the twin towers in New York—one at 8:45 a.m.

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NBAA 2001

Super Midsize Bizjets Defy Dreary Market

WASHINGTON Don’t expect builders of super midsize business jets to be singing the blues at this year’s National Business Aviation Assn.’s annual convention in New Orleans. That’s because purchases in this not-too-big-but-not-too-small market niche remain strong in the face of a worldwide economy that refuses to jump-start and heavy competition among dozens of business jet models available or soon-to-be available.

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NBAA 2001

Weak Economy Taking Toll on Business Aviation

Threat of recession and flat sales are spurring layoffs, but order backlogs remain strong

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TERROR IN AMERICA

Devastated NYC Resilient Amid Grief

NEW YORK Like a casual flick of a finger on a stack of dominoes, terrorist-pilots sent a Manhattan landmark tumbling into hell. On 8:45 a.m. on Sept. 11, American Airlines Flight 11, a Boeing 767, with 65 passengers and 11 crewmembers onboard, crashed into the North Tower (No. 2) of the World Trade Center.

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TERROR IN AMERICA

Aviation Will Come Back Gradually From Stand-Down

WASHINGTON On Sept. 11, 2001, the day terrorists turned commercial transport aircraft into weapons of destruction and America turned itself into a nofly zone, U.S. airlines put their economic problems aside and focused their efforts on getting back in the air again.

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